Monday, April 16, 2018

US Nitrogen Disclosure Document

Ammonium Nitrate Solution Safety Data Sheet
SDS: P-2 Version: 5 Revision Date: 06/03/2016
SECTION 1: IDENTIFICATION
Product Identifier: Ammonium Nitrate Solution
Product Names
and Synonyms: Ammonium Nitrate Solution, ANS, ANSOL
Intended Use: As an ingredient in commercial explosives.
Intended Users: For use only under strictly controlled conditions and only by qualified personnel who are fully trained in the handling and use of this product.
Name, Address, and Telephone of the Responsible Party:
Austin Powder Company
25800 Science Park Dr.
Cleveland, OH 44122
216-464-2400 during normal business hours
877-836-8286 Toll Free 24/7
www.austinpowder.com
In Case of Emergency Call CHEMTREC – TOLL FREE 24/7
800-424-9300 DOMESTIC
1-703-527-3887 INTERNATIONAL AND MARINE
SECTION 2: HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
Classification of the Substance or Mixture:
Code
Hazard Class
Hazard Category
H272
Oxidizing Liquid
3
H303
Acute Toxicity, oral
5
H315
Skin Corrosion / Irritation
2
H319
Serious eye damage / eye irritation
2A
H335
Specific target organ toxicity, single exposure; Respiratory tract irritation
3
Label Elements
Warning
Hazard Statements
May intensify fire; oxidizer
May be harmful if swallowed
Causes skin irritation
Causes eye irritation
May cause respiratory irritation
Precautionary Statements
Keep away from heat, hot surfaces, sparks, open flames and other ignition sources. No smoking.
Do not breathe fumes.
Wear eye protection, protective gloves recommended.
Ammonium Nitrate Solution (SDS: P-2) Safety Data Sheet
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IF SWALLOWED: Get immediate medical attention. DO NOT induce vomiting.
IF ON SKIN: Wash contact area with soap and water. If irritation occurs, get medical attention.
Take off contaminated clothing and wash before reuse.
IF INHALED: Remove person to fresh air. Keep at rest in a position comfortable for breathing.
IF IN EYES: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present and easy to
do. Continue rinsing. If eye irritation persists, get medical attention.
If exposed or concerned, or you do not feel well: Get medical attention.
Store locked-up in a ventilated space, in accordance with all applicable regulations.
Dispose of contents/container in accordance with all applicable regulations.
Other Hazards:
In case of fire: Extreme risk of explosion. Evacuate area.
Exposure reaction may be aggravated for those with pre-existing eye, skin, or respiratory conditions.
Causes methemoglobinemia. Methemoglobinemia decreases the blood’s ability to carry oxygen and results in
symptoms such as dizziness, drowsiness, headache, shortness of breath, blue skin and lips, rapid heart rate,
unconsciousness, and possibly death.
Unknown Acute Toxicity: Not available
SECTION 3: COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Name
CAS No.
% (w/w)
Ammonium nitrate
CAS No. 6484-52-2
75-90
SECTION 4: FIRST AID MEASURES
General: This material may be hot during transportation and storage, up to 115oC (240oF); take
the proper precautions. Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. If
you feel unwell, get medical attention, show the label where possible.
Inhalation: When symptoms occur: move to open air, keep at rest and in a position comfortable for
breathing. Get medical attention. Ventilate suspected area.
Skin Contact: Wash contact areas with soap and water. Remove contaminated clothing. Wash
contaminated clothing before reuse.
Eye Contact: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present and
easy to do so. Continue rinsing. Get medical attention if irritation persists.
Ingestion: Rinse mouth. DO NOT induce vomiting. Get medical attention.
Most Important Symptoms and Effects both Acute and Delayed:
Inhalation: May cause irritation to the respiratory tract, symptoms include:
sneezing, coughing, burning sensation of throat with constricting sensation of the
larynx and difficulty in breathing.
Skin Contact: May cause mild skin irritation. Symptoms may include: redness, pain, swelling, itching,
burning, dryness and dermatitis. May cause a more severe irritation or allergic reaction
in sensitive individuals.
Eye Contact: May cause serious eye irritation. Symptoms may include redness, pain, swelling,
itching, burning, tearing and blurred vision.
Ingestion: Ammonium nitrate ingestion may cause methemoglobinemia. Initial manifestation of
methemoglobinemia is cyanosis, characterized by blue lips, tongue and mucous
membranes, with skin color being slate grey. Further manifestation is characterized
by headache, weakness, dyspnea, dizziness, stupor, respiratory distress and death
Ammonium Nitrate Solution (SDS: P-2) Safety Data Sheet
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due to anoxia. If ingested, nitrates may be reduced to nitrites by bacteria in the
digestive tract. Signs and symptoms of nitrite poisoning include methemoglobinemia,
nausea, dizziness, increased heart rate, hypotension, fainting and, possibly shock.
Chronic Symptoms: May cause irritation to the respiratory tract.
Indication of Any Immediate Medical Attention and Special Treatment Needed:
If exposed, concerned or you don’t feel well, get medical attention.
SECTION 5: FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
DO NOT fight fires involving Ammonium Nitrate. There is an extreme risk that ammonium nitrate involved in a fire may detonate, especially if confined. Evacuate the area in all directions for one (1) mile or more if any amount of ammonium nitrate is involved in a fire. Evacuation is recommended if the initial (incipient) fire, not involving ammonium nitrate, becomes intense. General extinguishers may be used on the initial fire, not involving ammonium nitrate, such as electrical equipment fires, tire fires or a general plant fire. Water may be used to cool ammonium nitrate not involved in the initial fire. Consult the most current Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG), Guide 140 for additional information.
Extinguishing Media
Suitable Extinguishing Media: None.
Unsuitable Extinguishing Media: For fires near ammonium nitrate solution, dry chemical, foams,
steam and smothering devices are not effective, can lead to
possible explosion and must not be used.
Special Hazards Arising from the Substance or Mixture
Fire Hazard: There is an extreme risk that ammonium nitrate involved in a fire may
detonate. In a fire, the water portion of the solution boils off quickly,
leaving solid or molten ammonium nitrate.
Advice for Firefighters
Precautionary Measures: It is recommended that the amount and location of ammonium nitrate
solution stored near a fire be determined prior to committing firefighters
to fight the fire.
Firefighting Instructions: When fighting the initial fire, not involving ammonium nitrate, firefighters
should follow standard firefighting procedures for the materials involved.
Hazardous Combustion No unusual combustion products are expected. However, toxic fumes will be present.
SECTION 6: ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
Personal Precautions, Protective Equipment and Emergency Procedures
General Measures: Contact the manufacturer or CHEMTREC. No smoking, open flames or
flame/spark producing items in the area. This material may be hot
during transportation and storage, up to 115ºC (240ºF), take the
proper precautions.
For Non-Emergency Personnel
Protective Equipment: Use appropriate personal protection equipment (PPE).
Ammonium Nitrate Solution (SDS: P-2) Safety Data Sheet
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Emergency Procedures: Isolate the area from unnecessary personnel.
For Emergency Personnel
Protective Equipment: Provide cleanup crew with proper PPE.
Emergency Procedures: Ventilate area.
Emergency Precautions: Stop the discharge if safe to do so. Ventilate area.
Methods and Material for
Containment and Cleaning Up: Contact manufacturer or CHEMTREC.
SECTION 7: HANDLING AND STORAGE
Precautions for Safe Handling
Additional Hazards Any proposed use of this product in elevated temperature processes
when Processed: should be thoroughly evaluated to assure that safe operating conditions
are established and maintained. A “hot work” program consistent
with OSHA requirements at 29 CFR 1910.252 must be used when
performing hot work on ammonium nitrate process equipment,
storage areas or containers related to the intended use.
Hygiene Measures: Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety
procedures. Wash hands and other exposed areas with soap and water
before eating, drinking, or smoking and again when leaving work.
Wash contaminated clothing before reuse.
Conditions for Safe Storage, Including Any Incompatibilities
Technical Measures: May be corrosive to metals. Smoking, open flames, and unauthorized
sparking or flame-producing devices are prohibited.
Storage Conditions: Storage areas should be inspected regularly by an individual trained
to identify potential hazards and ensure that all safety and security
control measures are being properly implemented. All ammonium
nitrate storage sites must comply with ATF, OSHA or NRCAN
regulations.
Incompatible Materials: Avoid contamination with combustible or flammable materials, strong
acids, strong bases, strong oxidizing agents, reducing agents, chlorinated
compounds, copper (any alloys like bronze and brass), metal powders
and peroxides.
Special Rules on Packaging: Packaging in accordance with USDOT or NRCAN regulations.
SECTION 8: EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
Occupational exposure limits:
Ammonium nitrate, CAS No. 6484-52-2
USA ACGIH (nuisance dust)
ACGIH TWA (mg/m3)
10 mg/m3 – Inhalable particulate
USA OSHA (nuisance dust)
OHSA PEL (TWA) (mg/m3)
5 mg/m3 – Respirable (particulate)
Exposure Controls:
Appropriate Engineering Controls: Product should be handled and used under strictly controlled conditions.
Emergency eye wash fountains and safety showers should be available in the
vicinity of any potential exposure, but are not required.
Ammonium Nitrate Solution (SDS: P-2) Safety Data Sheet
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Personal Protective Equipment:
Hand Protection: Chemical and heat resistant gloves.
Eye Protection: Safety glasses with side shields or safety goggles.
Respiratory Protection: Approved respiratory protection should be worn when recommended by a risk
assessment or if irritation is experienced.
SECTION 9: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
Information on Physical and Chemical Properties:
Appearance: Clear liquid
Odor: Slight ammonia odor
Odor threshold: Not available
Vapor density: Not relevant
pH: 4-6
Freezing point (Crystal point): 75% solution – 40°C (105°F)
90% solution – 95°C (202°F)
Initial boiling point and boiling range: Not available
Flash point: Not relevant
Evaporation rate: Not available
Flammability: Will not burn
Upper / lower flammability or explosive limits: Not available
Vapor pressure: Not available
Bulk Density: 75% solution – 1.35 g/cc (11.3 lb/gal)
90% solution – 1.41 g/cc (11.8 lb/gal)
Solubility (for ammonium nitrate in water): 118 g/100 ml @ 0°C (32°F)
Partition coefficient: n-octol/water: Not available
Auto-ignition temperature: Not available Decomposition temperature: 210°C (410°F)
Viscosity: Not relevant
Explosive properties: Mass detonation hazard when involved in a fire
Explosion Data – Sensitivity to Mechanical Impact: Not sensitive to mechanical impact
Explosion Data – Sensitivity to Static Discharge: Not sensitive to static discharge
SECTION 10: STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
Reactivity and Chemical Stability: Stable and non-reactive under normal conditions of transportation, storage, handling and use.
Possibility of Hazardous Reactions: Polymerization will not occur.
Conditions to Avoid: Open flame and elevated temperatures.
Incompatible Materials: Avoid contamination with combustible or flammable materials, strong acids,
strong bases, strong oxidizing agents, reducing agents, chlorinated
compounds, copper (any alloys like bronze and brass), metal powders and
peroxides.
Hazardous Decomposition Products: No unusual fumes or decomposition products expected. However, toxic fumes will be present.
Ammonium Nitrate Solution (SDS: P-2) Safety Data Sheet
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SECTION 11: TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION
Acute Toxicity: See section 2
LD50 and LC50 Data: Not classified
Skin Corrosion/Irritation: May cause skin irritation
Eye Damage/Irritation: May cause serious eye irritation
Respiratory or Skin Sensitization: Not classified
Germ Cell Mutagenicity: Not classified
Teratogenicity: Not available
Carcinogenicity: Not classified
Reproductive Toxicity: Not classified
Specific Target Organ Toxicity
(Single Exposure): May cause drowsiness or dizziness
Specific Target Organ Toxicity
(Repeated Exposure): Not classified.
Aspiration Hazard: Not classified
Symptoms/Injuries Harmful if inhaled, causes methemoglobinemia. Symptoms may include
after Inhalation: headache, dizziness, nausea and a loss of coordination.
Symptoms/Injuries May cause mild skin irritation. Symptoms may include: redness, pain,
after Skin Contact: swelling, itching, burning, dryness and dermatitis. May cause a more
severe or allergic reaction in sensitive individuals.
Symptoms/Injuries May cause serious eye irritation. Symptoms may include redness,
after Eye Contact: pain, swelling, itching, burning, tearing and blurred vision.
Symptoms/Injuries Burning sensation. Abdominal pain. Abdominal cramps. Vomiting.
after Ingestion: Ammonium nitrate ingestion may cause methemoglobinemia.
Chronic Symptoms: Although none are expected under normal conditions, inhalation exposure may cause methemoglobinemia and may damage respiratory tract.
LD50 and LC50 Data (ingredients):
Ammonium nitrate, CAS No. 6484-52-2
LD50 Oral Rat
2,217 mg/kg of body weight
LC50 Inhalation Rat
> 88.8 mg/l/4h
SECTION 12: ECOLOGY INFORMATION
Not available
SECTION 13: DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
Call manufacturer or CHEMTREC.
Ammonium Nitrate Solution (SDS: P-2) Safety Data Sheet
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SECTION 14: TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Agency
UN Number
Proper Shipping Name
Hazard
Class
Label
Codes
PG
Marine
Pollutant
Other
US DOT
UN2426
Ammonium nitrate, liquid, (hot concentrated solution).
5.1
5.1
--
No
ERG-140
Canadian TDG
UN2426
Ammonium nitrate liquid, (hot concentrated solution).
5.1
5.1
--
No
--
IMDG (Vessel)
UN1942
Ammonium nitrate, liquid
5.1
5.1
--
No
EmS-No,
Fire: F-H
Spillage: S-Q
IATA (Air)
Contact the manufacturer
SECTION 15: REGULATORY INFORMATION
US Federal Regulations:
Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA), a/k/a Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III
Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
TSCA Section 8
Ammonium nitrate, CAS No. 6484-52-2
SARA Section 311/312
Reactive Hazard
Fire Hazard
Health Hazard
TSCA
Listed on the United States TSCA inventory
Canadian Regulations:
Domestic Substances List (DSL)
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
Ammonium nitrate, CAS No. 6484-52-2
DSL
Listed on the Canadian DSL
WHMIS Classification
Class C – Oxidizing Substance
Class D, Division 2, Subdivision B – Toxic material causing other toxic effects.
SECTION 16: OTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING DATE OF LAST REVISION
This SDS was prepared in accordance with US (29 CFR 1900.1200) and Canadian (WHMIS 2015) requirements.
SDS: P-2 Initial Issue Date: 6/1/2015 Last Revision Date: 06/03/2015 Version: 5
Party Responsible for the Preparation of this Document:
Austin Powder Company
Cleveland, OH 44122
216-464-2400
This information is based on Austin Powder Company’s current knowledge and is intended to describe the product for the purposes of health and safety requirements only. It should not be construed as guaranteeing any specific property of the product.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

US Nitrogen Discloses Chemical Risks


By Walter F. Roche Jr.

A report filed by a Greene County chemical company warns of the risk of detonation and fire along with severe reactions. including death if the company's primary product is accidentally ingested.
The filing, known as a Safety Data Sheet, was submitted this week to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation by US Nitrogen, which manufactures ammonium nitrate for use in making explosives by its parent firm, Austin Powder, based in Ohio.
"There is an extreme risk that ammonium nitrate involved in a fire may detonate, especially if confined," the document states. It states that if a fire should occur involving the chemical, the area should be evacuated.
"If swallowed," the data sheet states,"get immediate medical attention...Do not induce vomiting," it continues, adding that symptoms include cyanosis, respiratory distress and death.
Ingestion, the filing states, causes methenoglobinemia, a condition in which too little oxygen is present in red blood cells
Skin exposure to the chemical can cause skin corrosion and irritation. Exposure to the eye can cause "serious eye damage," the disclosure states.
The seven page filing was submitted to TDEC yesterday.
The company also submitted to TDEC a report that they have completed testing the conductivity pf the condenser return water for 60 days of continuous operation. The testing relates to the production of carbon dioxide which is used by Praxair, a company operating on the same site as US Nitrogen.
Contact: wfrochejr999@gmail.com

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Landowners Can Amend Pipeline Complaint


By Walter F. Roche Jr.

A chancery court judge has ruled that a group of Eastern Tennessee landowners can file an amended complaint in their suit challenging the legality of a state permit that authorized the placement of pipelines from a Mosheim manufacturing firm to the Nolichucky River.
In a four-page ruling Davidson Chancery Court Judge Ellen Hobbs-Lyle concluded that the landowners can add language to their existing complaint to include charges that the pipeline did not remain within the right-of-way and trespassed on property of the landowners.
She said the amendment could be allowed because the "threatened application (of the permit) interferes with or impairs ... the legal rights or privileges" of the plaintiffs in the case.
The ruling is the latest development in a lengthy legal battle over twin pipelines being utilized by US Nitrogen, a chemical firm producing ammonium nitrate with water taken from the Nolichucky River.
The suit was filed by six landowners with property along the river. Their suit was originally dismissed by another chancery court judge but then reinstated on appeal. Defendants in the case include the Tennessee Department of Transportation, US Nitrogen and the Industrial Development Board of Greeneville and Greene County.
In her ruling Lyle-Hobbs did bar still further additions to the original complaint concluding that those changes would be futile because they "would not have helped the plaintiffs recover under their claims."
She also stated that similar claims already were the subject of litigation in Greene County.
"It is therefore, prejudicial, to have those issues litigated in two forums with the potential for inconsistent results," the ruling states.
Contact: wfrochejr999@gmail.com

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

TDEC Waives Permits for Mega-Tanks


By Walter F. Roche Jr.

Acting in less than a week Tennessee environmental officials have agreed that US Nitrogen can use two mega-tanks to hold ammonium nitrate without going through a permitting process.
In a letter dated today a deputy director of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation told US Nitrogen Plant Manager Andrew Velo that a department review had determined that use of the tanks would be classified as an insignificant activity under state laws and regulations. Therefore they will not require new permits.
According to US Nitrogen's application, which was received by TDEC on March 22, the two tanks will have a combined capacity of nearly 60,000 gallons. One tank holds 22,842 gallons, while the other has a 36,687 gallon capacity.
"It has been determined that the source described in your letter would constitute insignificant activity," John P. Johnson, a
TDEC deputy director wrote in a letter to Velo.
The delivery of the mega tanks earlier this year to US Nitrogen's Mosheim facility created a mini-spectacle as trucks manuevered over local roads.
"Specifically," Johnson continued, "this operation would result in potential emissions from this source of less than five tons per year of each air contaminant and each regulated air pollutant that is not a hazardous air pollutant and less than 1,000 pounds per year of each hazardous air pollutant."
He concluded by stating that US Nitrogen still must meet all other air pollution regulations that apply to its operation.
Contact: wfrochejr999@gmail.com

Friday, March 23, 2018

US Nitrogen Puts Mega-Tanks in Service

By Walter F. Roche Jr.

US Nitrogen has notified state environmental officials that it is putting two mega-tanks into service and the company contends that no state permit is required.

The two tanks will be used to store ammonium nitrate. One tank has a 22,842 gallon capacity, while the other holds 34,687 gallons for a total of nearly 60,000 gallons, according to the letter sent this week by US Nitrogen Plant Manager Andrew Velo.
In the letter to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Velo wrote that since the two tanks are projected to release less than five tons of air contaminants a year,the company does not believe any permits are required.
Velo wrote that the emissions would be classified as an "insignificant activity," under state laws and regulations.
"We believe they meet the definition," Velo wrote, adding that the company does not believe they require an air permit or a modification of any existing permits.

Contact: wfrochejr999@gmail.com

Saturday, March 17, 2018

US Nitrogen Responds to Violations Notice


By Walter F. Roche Jr.

A Greene County chemical company has responded to some but not nearly all of a series of issues raised by state environmental following an inspection of the facility.

In an eight-page letter sent to the state this week US Nitrogen Plant Manager Andrew Velo also provided copies of several of  the company's Standard Operating Procedures and a timetable for implementing changes.

In response to seven specific issues however, Velo repeated his request for a meeting with officials of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

The responses are the latest volley in a battle of words between TDEC officials and US Nitrogen over the critical compliance inspection report. In its initial response US Nitrogen denied that the inspection had actually turned up any evidence that the company was in violation of any of its permits.

TDEC responded by stating that there were indeed permit violations.

TDEC Manager Chris Rhodes wrote that "any failure to comply with permit requirements is a violation."

In its latest response US Nitrogen agreed to provide TDEC with documents relating to a new emulsion facility and the emulsion product being produced but said it had not yet decided whether to produce another new product, aqueous ammonia.

"If US Nitrogen decides to produce AN-20, we will notify the division before production," the letter states.

As for alterations in a retention pond that TDEC had questioned, Velo described changes as minor modifications but also provided a water flow schematic requested by the state.

But for a series of questions raised by TDEC, Velo wrote, "US Nitrogen requests a meeting with division personnel regarding regulatory reporting to ensure complete understanding of protocols going forward."

Velo added, "US Nitrogen would like to thank TDEC for clarifying that US Nitrogen did not impact Nolichucky River water quality."

In its initial inspection report, TDEC had stated that both upstream and downstream readings in the river showed a failure to meet target standards.

"Thus both stations showed some impact to water quality," the report stated.

The report did not attribute the negative impact to US Nitrogen or any other party, though some published reports drew that conclusion.

In other responses, US Nitrogen agreed to "re-evaluate" the drainage within a drainage basin "to confirm that there is no discrete conveyance of storm water within facility boundaries."

Velo also told TDEC the company was revising its sludge management plan and promised to provide a copy of that plan by July 31. But he wrote that the company was unable to locate past transformer inspection reports requested by the state.

"Improvements have been implemented to maintain transformer inspection reports," the letter concludes.

Contact: wfrochejr999@gmail.com





Friday, March 16, 2018

TDEC Seeks Answer on US Nitrogen Permit


By Walter F. Roche Jr.

Tennessee environmental officials are seeking detailed data before acting on US Nitrogen's request to renew a key permit for its Greene County chemical manufacturing facility.
In a 12-page letter, including a three-page attachment, a deputy director for the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has asked the ammonium nitrate manufacturer to respond to the more than a dozen questions within 60 days. The renewal application was submitted on June 9 of last year but the company subsequently submitted several amendments.
Questions posed by Deputy Director James P. Johnson include backup data for calculations of carbon dioxide produced in the process of producing anhydrous ammonia.
Other data requested includes the amount of nitrous dioxide emissions produced in the two pieces of equipment, known as trains, used to produce ammonia.
The letter notes that US Nitrogen's actual production rate for nitric acid appears to be far below the limit set in its permit.
Johnson also wrote that an on site review at the Midway facility raised questions about whether storage tanks on the site were properly permitted.
"During the Feb. 21 site visit we discussed the possibility that some of the storage tanks at the facility may not be properly permitted," the letter states, adding that state rules set specific limits on the level of emissions permissible for a permit exemption.
"US Nitrogen should submit forms and calculations, as requested below, in order to document that the tanks do not need to be permitted," Johnson wrote
Other questions raised in the letter include the ammonia injection rates used during performance tests and the test reports on the volume of volatile organic compound emissions.
The questions come amid an ongoing dispute between the company and TDEC over the findings in a nearly month long site visit by TDEC officials.
Contact: wfrochejr999@gmail.com